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Re: How would you define evil?


quote:

katie5445 wrote:

quote:

Philer wrote:

There's something else to keep in mind, katie. Suppose that different states and different legal maneuvers explained the differences in the sentences between what Dr. Lisa Tseng received and those two male doctors. Why would the legal system continue to act as if those differences don't matter? Especially if the concept of "equal justice under the law" was actually taken seriously?

Judges should not impose much greater sentences on women than what men receive for the same sort of crimes whether those men are in different states or not. And if they do, appellate courts should not tolerate those extreme disparities.

People of both genders should receive comparable sentences for the same crimes. The notion that this society can't manage to see to that because there are 50 states and different legal jurisdictions is ludicrous.



You will have to provide a helluva lot of cases to prove any of your points.



I have done that. At one time I examined the domestic homicide cases in the state of Idaho and found out that men were systematically treated more leniently than women in those kinds of cases. Men who killed wives usually being convicted of second degree murder or manslaughter and given relatively short sentences while women who killed husbands were convicted of first degree murder and given life sentences. That was true over a period of three or four years.

In addition I've talked about all sorts of homicide cases in various states both here and elsewhere. The pattern is almost always the same. Women charged with first degree murder while men are either charged with second degree murder for the same kind of crime or even manslaughter. Some times juries have had the option to convict a known murderer of first degree murder but have opted to convict him of manslaughter. Sometimes they have acquitted them as in the alleged sleep walking case we've discussed.

But I'm curious, how many cases do you think would qualify as proof that this pattern exists. You said a "hell of a lot" but what would that be?

When I presented the results of my state wide study of Idaho cases that wasn't convincing to those who disagreed. And that was more than a few cases.

I've known for a long time that this pattern exists and it didn't take all that many cases for me to discover it. Just one can illustrate the problem as the O. J. Simpson case did as well as the Debra Milke case, one which involved almost no evidence other than a crooked cop's testimony which still resulted in a jury sending a woman to death row.

Then there are Texas cases where men who have killed women have either been acquitted by juries or given probation.

The evidence of this problem of bias favoring men on the part of juries is easy to find if one isn't interested in ignoring it.
12/7/2018, 3:26 am Link to this post PM Philer Blog
 
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Re: How would you define evil?


A hell of a lot is a hell of a lot. as in years and thousands, that is what a proper study is. You can't just "talk about it" that doesn't count. There are probably thousands of men who shouldn't be in jail for horrible crimes they did not commit, spending decades or executed. Personally, man or woman no one should be in that place, your gender doesn't matter.
12/7/2018, 4:38 am Link to this post PM katie5445 Blog
 
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Re: How would you define evil?


quote:

katie5445 wrote:

A hell of a lot is a hell of a lot. as in years and thousands, that is what a proper study is. You can't just "talk about it" that doesn't count. There are probably thousands of men who shouldn't be in jail for horrible crimes they did not commit, spending decades or executed. Personally, man or woman no one should be in that place, your gender doesn't matter.



What about predictability? If I'm right I should be able to predict the outcome of criminal trials. I predicted before O. J. Simpson was acquitted that he would not be convicted of first degree murder. I may have been one of the few people not surprised by the outcome of that trial. Other outcomes were also predictable. One of the few times I was surprised was the Casey Anthony trial and she was not on trial for murdering a man.

I've studied this phenomenon for many years, since the early eighties. I've also looked at trial results going back to the beginning of the 19th century. The same pattern has always been there.

Also, as I've mentioned one trial can be very illuminating. When twelve people on a jury couldn't care less about the female victim and acquit or place on probation a man whom they know murdered her it's not insignificant. That kind of thing can easily happen again and again and it has.

That sleepwalking case is just one example. In Texas a jury placed a murderer on probation for ten years because his murdered girlfriend had supposedly dealt in cocaine. I guess they figured she deserved to be murdered.

12/8/2018, 2:30 am Link to this post PM Philer Blog
 


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