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gopqed Profile
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Re: So should Congress investigate Trump's attempts to obstruct justice?


quote:

cooter50 wrote:

So what he says BWAHAHAHAHA!!! Let me see, if the LARGEST investigational staffing in the US DOJ could NOT find enough for support of criminal charges, who actually could? Are you really that foolish to consider another entity will? BWAHAHAHAHAHA!!

Which BTW the remaining investigational departments would be RELIANT on the FBI and CIA for deeper information, to which THERE IS NONE.



It's not that Mueller didn't find sufficient evidence, it's that the DOJ says he couldn't indict a sitting President, and that it has to be, at this point, left to Congress.
4/21/2019, 3:44 pm Link to this post PM gopqed Blog
 
Geezesss Profile
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Re:


So what he says BWAHAHAHAHA!!! Let me see, if the LARGEST investigational staffing in the US DOJ could NOT find enough for support of criminal charges, who actually could? Are you really that foolish to consider another entity will? BWAHAHAHAHAHA!!

Which is why I mentioned Benghazi .
Do you understand the reference ?

Last edited by Geezesss, 4/22/2019, 5:18 pm
4/21/2019, 4:21 pm Link to this post PM Geezesss Blog
 
cooter50 Profile
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So should Congress investigate Trump's attempts to obstruct justice as much they once did Benghazi ?


Still has NOTHING to do with this, Benghazi was NOT fully investigated, was fluffed off by the DOJ FBI miscreants in BHO and HRCs pockets.

BTW still changes NOTHING as to providing evidence to make YOUR case on DT, Show us the Evidence.
4/22/2019, 12:25 am Link to this post PM cooter50 Blog
 
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Re:


Cooter, did I say it was LIKE Benghazi, or should Congress investigate Trump's attempts to obstruct justice as much they once did Benghazi ?
4/22/2019, 5:24 pm Link to this post PM Geezesss Blog
 
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So should Congress investigate Trump's attempts to obstruct justice as much they once did Benghazi ?


I am still awaiting your list of Obstruction points, still not got any do you?
4/22/2019, 7:17 pm Link to this post PM cooter50 Blog
 
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Re:


Trump's DOJ has redacted them.

... by whole pages in places.
4/23/2019, 4:16 pm Link to this post PM Geezesss Blog
 
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So should Congress investigate Trump's attempts to obstruct justice as much they once did Benghazi ?


quote:

cooter50 wrote:

I am still awaiting your list of Obstruction points, still not got any do you?



The 10 times Trump may have obstructed justice, according to Mueller


Although the special counsel's report on Russian interference does not come to a conclusion as to whether President Trump obstructed justice, Robert Mueller's team did examine 10 "discrete acts" in which he may have done so.

The report says these 10 instances can be divided into "two phases, reflecting a possible shift in the president's motives." The first phase took place before Mr. Trump fired his first FBI director, James Comey, after he had been reassured he was not personally under investigation. After Comey's dismissal and Mueller's appointment as special counsel, the report indicates, the president knew he was now under investigation for possibly obstructing justice, and switched gears.

"At that point, the president engaged in a second phase of conduct, involving public attacks on the investigation, non-public efforts to control it, and efforts both in public and private to encourage witnesses not to cooperate with the investigation," the report states.

Here are the 10 times, according to the Mueller report, that Mr. Trump may have obstructed justice.

"The campaign's response to reports about Russian support for Trump"

The first instance of possible obstruction detailed in the report occurred during the 2016 campaign, when questions first "arose about the Russian government's apparent support for candidate Trump."

"Conduct involving FBI Director Comey and Michael Flynn"

The second instance involves Mr. Trump's first national security adviser, Michael Flynn, who left the administration just weeks into Mr. Trump's presidency after he misled FBI agents and top administration officials — including Vice President Mike Pence — about his conversations with Russian Ambassador Sergey Kislyak. Flynn had said he had not discussed sanctions on Russia with Kislyak, a lie that Pence and others then repeated.

The day that Mr. Trump found out Flynn had lied to Pence and the FBI, he had dinner with Comey, whom he asked for "loyalty." Mr. Trump then secured Flynn's resignation on Feb. 13, 2017. "Now that we fired Flynn, the Russia thing is over," he told an outside adviser, who disagreed with the president's assessment.

That same day, Mr. Trump had another meeting with Comey and encouraged him to stop investigating Flynn. "I hope you can see your way clear to letting this go, to letting Flynn go. He is a good guy. I hope you can let this go," Mr. Trump said.

"The President's reaction to the continuing Russia investigation"

The third instance involves then-Attorney General Jeff Sessions, who was debating whether to recuse himself from the Russia investigation in February 2017, as well as Comey. Mr. Trump asked White House Counsel Don McGahn to talk Sessions out of recusal, and became angry when Sessions announced he would recuse himself on March 2. The president then asked Sessions to "unrecuse" himself.

"The President's termination of Comey"

The fourth instance stems from Mr. Trump's decision to fire Comey, which directly led to Mueller's appointment. Mr. Trump decided to fire Comey in May 2017 — days after the FBI director declined to tell Congress that Mr. Trump wasn't under investigation.

"The appointment of Special Counsel and efforts to remove him"

The fifth instance revolves around Mr. Trump's reaction to Mueller's appointment. Upon hearing the news that Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein had tasked Mueller with investigating the Russia matter in May 2017, the president privately declared it was "the end of his presidency." Mr. Trump then demanded Sessions' resignation, although he did not accept it at the time, and told aides Mueller had conflicts of interest that should preclude him from acting as the special counsel.

"Efforts to prevent public disclosure of evidence"

The sixth instance stems from the June 2016 meeting between top campaign aides and "a Russian lawyer who was said to be offering damaging information about Hillary Clinton as 'part of Russia and its government's support for Mr. Trump.'"

Mr. Trump told his aides "not to publicly disclose the emails setting up the June 9 meeting, suggesting that the email would not leak and that the number of lawyers with access to them should be limited." Donald Trump Jr., who had been present at the Trump Tower meeting, wrote a press release saying "the meeting was with 'an individual who [Trump Jr.] was told might have information helpful to the campaign'" — a line that was edited out about the president.

Mr. Trump's personal lawyer then denied to reporters the president had "played any role" in Trump Jr.'s statement.

"Further efforts to have the Attorney General take control of the investigation"

The seventh instance has to do with Mr. Trump's repeated attempts to have Sessions "reverse his recusal." Mr. Trump asked Sessions to do this in the summer of 2017. The following December, Mr. Trump told Sessions he would be a "hero" if he took control of the investigation.

Additionally, in October 2017, the president asked Sessions to "take [a] look" at investigating Hillary Clinton.

"Efforts to have McGahn deny that the President had ordered him to have the Special Counsel removed"

The eighth instance concerns Mr. Trump's efforts to get McGahn to dispute press accounts that the president had instructed him to try and get rid of Mueller. In early 2018, Mr. Trump told White House officials to tell McGahn to rebut the stories, but McGahn told the officials the stories were true. Mr. Trump then personally appealed to McGahn, telling him in an Oval Office meeting to deny the reports.

"Conduct towards Flynn, Manafort, [Redacted]"

The ninth instance stems from Mr. Trump's response to the prosecutions of Flynn and Paul Manafort, his former campaign chairman, as well as an individual whose identity was redacted.

"After Flynn withdrew from a joint defense agreement with the president and began cooperating with the government, the president's personal counsel left a message for Flynn 's attorneys reminding them of the president's warm feelings towards Flynn, which he said 'still remains,' and asking for a 'heads up' if Flynn knew 'information that implicates the president,'" the report states.

"Conduct involving Michael Cohen"

The tenth and final instance of potential obstruction concerns Mr. Trump's behavior toward Michael Cohen, his onetime personal lawyer. Mr. Trump profusely praised Cohen when he remained loyal to the administration, at one point personally calling to encourage him to "stay strong," only to criticize him viciously when he began cooperating with the government.

Edited for brevity. Read full article HERE.


Last edited by Tombstone1881, 4/25/2019, 1:38 am


---
We never had FAKE NEWS until we had a FAKE PRESIDENT! Chelsea Handler
4/25/2019, 1:34 am Link to this post PM Tombstone1881
 
Geezesss Profile
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Re: Benghazi was NOT fully investigated


quote:

cooter50 wrote:

Still has NOTHING to do with this, Benghazi was NOT fully investigated, was fluffed off by the DOJ FBI miscreants in BHO and HRCs pockets.

BTW still changes NOTHING as to providing evidence to make YOUR case on DT, Show us the Evidence.



First, Cooter, is there ever telling a authoritarian like you anything? We know your ways. So out of the gate your obstructionism is rightly discounted. Period.

Then, if I unfairly apply logic and integrity to your silliness : IF "Benghazi was NOT fully investigated" again;

 So should Congress investigate Trump's attempts to obstruct justice at least as much they once did Benghazi ? (9 DIFFERENT INVESTIGATIONS, WHICH STILL, WAS NOT ENOUGH, ACCORDING TO YOU ? ... " Benghazi was NOT fully investigated" )

If not, why not, Boss ?
Use your words to justify your own double standards, please.





Last edited by Geezesss, 4/25/2019, 3:50 pm
4/25/2019, 3:34 pm Link to this post PM Geezesss Blog
 
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Re:


A apologists, please, site the law against "collusion" .
It is Trump's bait and switch ... he is not guilty of what is not a crime.
That is a pretty low bar, isn't it ?
Don't be fooled by the fast talking con man.
4/25/2019, 4:11 pm Link to this post PM Geezesss Blog
 
shiftless2 Profile
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So should Congress investigate Trump's attempts to obstruct justice as much they once did Benghazi ?


[bDONALD TRUMP MAY ALREADY BE COMMITTING NEW CRIMES
In retaliating against witnesses, the president is leaving himself open to the possibility of fresh criminal charges—and possible indictment after he exits the White House.

Donald Trump’s habit of tweeting every insane thought that comes into his head has always been a liability, in that it paints a picture of an unwell man not fit to be left alone unsupervised, let alone run the country. But, as the Mueller report showed, the president’s social-media musings can come back to haunt him, such as when his tweeting about Paul Manafort was cited as possible evidence of obstruction. So you might think that the president would shy away from saying or writing anything that could be used against him when it comes to potential impeachment proceedings—growing more likely by the day!—or future criminal indictments, but then you’d catch yourself and realize that was obvious crazy talk. Instead, Trump has tweeted about the Russia probe more than 50 times in the the days since the redacted Mueller report was released, with increasingly forceful attacks on former White House counsel Don McGahn, who Trump allies fear could help lawmakers build a case for impeachment. Indeed, reports Politico, going on a rage-filled vendetta against McGahn, who knows where all Trump’s bodies are buried, is probably one of the president’s dumber ideas:

Team Trump’s bellicose tweets and public statements in the last few days are potentially exposing Trump to fresh charges of witness intimidation, obstruction of justice, and impeding a congressional investigation—not to mention giving lawmakers more fodder for their presidential probes—according to Democrats and legal experts.


Already, a fusillade of verbal assaults aimed at former White House counsel Don McGahn, a star witness in the Mueller report, have sparked questions about obstruction and witness intimidation as Democrats fight the Trump White House to get McGahn’s documents and testimony . . . The months ahead are also littered with a bevy of opportunities that could entice Trump to offer more barbed opinions—and more material for his investigators. His longtime associate Roger Stone goes on trial this November, tempting Trump to weigh in like he did during Paul Manafort’s trial, when the president posted tweets that were later cited in the Mueller report as evidence of obstruction.


“This is risky,” William Jeffress, a Washington defense attorney, told reporters Darren Samuelsohn, Andrew Desiderio, and Kyle Cheney. “I find it surprising because he’s taking these shots at witnesses who gave information to Mueller, and I think he’s got to be careful because there’s an explicit federal statute punishing retaliation against witnesses.”

Trump allies, of course, disagree and are seemingly intent on egging him on. “I don’t think he’s afraid of anything,” said longtime associate Michael Caputo, theorizing that the president’s online tirades are part of some kind of three-dimensional chess game, and that he’s deploying a “briar-patch strategy trying to tempt the Democrats into a suicidal venture of impeachment.” Joe diGenova, an “informal Trump legal adviser,” also claimed Trump had nothing to worry about, telling Politico, “The president is doing exactly the right thing.”

Legal experts, however, beg to differ:

. . . many see the president’s continuous chatter as ripe material for federal prosecutors if they decided to take the monumental step of pursuing Trump after he’s out of office. While Mueller nodded to long-standing Justice Department legal opinions that a sitting president can’t be indicted as he explained his decision not to conclude whether Trump obstructed justice, he also included a footnote near the end of his report highlighting the risks that Trump nonetheless faces in both Congress and the courts.


Essentially, legal experts say, Mueller is signaling that Trump could face criminal charges even if he was impeached. Any prosecutors who indict Trump after he’s out of office would be working with a five-year statute of limitations on obstruction of justice cases. That means the president could only be exposed for any behavior during his first term if he doesn’t win re-election next November. But anything Trump does from here on out would keep restarting that five-year clock, meaning a second term wouldn’t make him bulletproof.


“It’s clear that the White House plans to obstruct all legitimate congressional oversight, just like Trump obstructed in Mueller’s probe at every turn, and witnesses previously obstructed our committee,” a House Intelligence Committee source said, arguing that the panel is “uniquely positioned” to investigate obstruction of its own probes, should the running commentary from Team Trump continue. “They’re acting like a scene out of America’s Dumbest Criminals,” said Julian Epstein, a chief counsel for House Judiciary Committee Democrats during the Clinton impeachment. “They just keep fueling a fire that has been the bane of their two years in the White House.”

Ivanka Trump’s women’s entrepreneur conference went really well

And by well we mean confused attendees were treated to a rambling monologue about terrorists by Senator Lindsey Graham, who the First Daughter apparently thought would make a great guest speaker:

“It’s the enemy of mankind, not just the United States,” Graham said, of the theoretical invaders, according to a recording provided to The Daily Beast. “Some of our soldiers will be needed, but not a lot. Most of the fighting will be done by people in the region. I promise you the enemy will lose because very few mothers or fathers want to turn their daughters over to ISIS, al Qaeda, or any other group.”


As the senator spoke, confused attendees could be heard on the recording asking each other in hushed tones what he was talking about. Graham and Trump, along with an American delegation that included Sen. Chris Coons (D-DE), were in Côte d’Ivoire to participate in the Women Entrepreneurship Finance Initiative (We-Fi). The initiative, an idea first proposed by Trump in 2017, is housed in the World Bank and is a global partnership with governments, banks, and other stakeholders. Its goal is to raise money to help prop up women-owned businesses.


“We’re going to win this struggle,” Graham told the group, according to The Daily Beast. “The only question is how long does it take and how many must die.”

Kushner mocked to his face about M.B.S. bromance

If only the camera had panned to get his reaction, à la actors at the Oscars:

Comedian Hasan Minhaj had the mic for a few minutes at Tuesday night’s Time 100 gala and he used the opportunity to call out Jared Kushner for his close relationship with Saudi crown prince Mohammed bin Salman.


“I know there’s a lot of very powerful people here, and it would be crazy if there was a high-ranking official in the White House that could WhatsApp M.B.S. and say, ‘Hey, maybe you could help that person get out of prison because they don’t deserve it,’” Minhaj said as he appeared to stare at Kushner. “But hey, that person would have to be in the room. It’s just a good comedy premise.”


Earlier in the day, Kushner—who really does uses WhatsApp to chat with his favorite Middle East dictator according to one former administration official—claimed that Russia’s election meddling amounted to buying “a couple of Facebook ads,” and was nothing compared to the “damage” inflicted on the country by the Mueller investigation.

https://www.vanityfair.com/news/2019/04/trump-may-already-be-committing-new-crimes?verso=true
4/25/2019, 5:09 pm Link to this post PM shiftless2 Blog
 


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