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Misogyny in the Trump and Weinstein era


Don't you all love the first line?

Misogyny in the Trump and Weinstein era

By Carlos Lozada

Let us now raze famous men.

Kate Manne’s “Down Girl: The Logic of Misogyny” is excruciatingly well-timed, providing a theoretical framework for a phenomenon baring itself before us, perverse and pervasive. Together with other books exploring recent infamous instances of sexism — from the Gamergate wars to the 2016 presidential campaign — “Down Girl” reminds us that while revealing individual misogynists is hard, uprooting misogyny is much harder.

“Misogyny should be understood as the ‘law enforcement’ branch of a patriarchal order, which has the overall function of policing and enforcing its governing ideology,” Manne writes. That ideology is sexism, the belief in inherent female inferiority, and misogyny is the mechanism that upholds and imposes that belief in daily life. “Sexism wears a lab coat, misogyny goes on witch hunts. . . . Sexism is bookish; misogyny is combative. Sexism has a theory; misogyny wields a cudgel.”

Misogyny’s primary targets are women who overtly undermine that power imbalance, “those who are perceived as insubordinate, negligent, or out of order,” Manne writes, those unwilling to be categorized only as the supportive wife, cool girlfriend, loyal assistant or attentive waitress. Women give, men take. But women violate the code if they call out powerful men for their misdeeds. Or if they try to take a man’s job — say, the presidency of the United States. Or if they just say no. “You’re no fun,” Matt Lauer reportedly told a colleague who resisted his advances.

This is why it’s so hard for women to publicly accuse men of predatory actions. The victims risk not being believed. Or getting blamed. Or having crimes investigated improperly. Or being called selfish, mendacious. Women suffer automatic “credibility deficits,” while men enjoy what Manne calls “himpathy,” the “excessive sympathy sometimes shown toward male perpetrators of sexual violence.”

That credibility deficit may be shrinking with each new charge against a high-profile man. When Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell looks at the allegations against GOP Senate candidate Roy Moore of Alabama and declares “I believe the women,” it seems the benefit of the doubt is no longer automatically with the accused. But recent events have not disproved Manne’s argument; they affirm the courage women must summon to speak truths they’ve held for years or decades, with the chance of being belittled, threatened or injured once again. And they remind us of the many women — facing an all-powerful department chair, a groping mid-level exec, a terrifying kitchen manager — who still fear taking the risk.

The 2016 presidential campaign offered another such target for the mob: Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton. In a new anthology, “Nasty Women” (the title evoking Donald Trump’s muttered insult to Clinton during their third presidential debate), several contributors examine the role of misogyny in the race, and their conclusion is unmistakable. “This election wasn’t simply a political contest,” memoirist Cheryl Strayed writes. “It was a referendum on how much America still hates women.” Who was responsible for Trump’s victory? “They’re white men,” explains anthology co-editor Kate Harding. “They’re white women who will do anything to maintain the protection of white men. They’re a few sexist men of color. They’re stone-cold racists.”

“My faith in the possibility of us as a collective, a village, was shaken by the 53 percent of white women who voted for The Bully,” writes essayist Sarah Michael Hollenbeck. Others are slightly more sympathetic, and persuasively so. “That there are a lot of women in the United States who are not feminists is not surprising,” Rebecca Solnit argues. “To be a feminist you have to believe in your equality and rights, which can make your life unpleasant and dangerous if you live in a marriage, a family, a community, a church, a state, that does not agree.”

Liberal men get no pass. “Men on the left can be nearly as relentless in their petulant demands for attention if you make a political choice they disapprove of, such as supporting an imperfect female candidate,” she writes. To a certain kind of progressive white man, “the right time for women is always some day in the future, and the right woman candidate is always the hypothetical one.”

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12/3/2017, 11:48 am Link to this post PM Bellelettres
 
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Re: Misogyny in the Trump and Weinstein era


[sign in to see URL] GOP sure changed their minds about Moore!

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"libido sciendi"..... the passion to know.
12/5/2017, 5:27 pm Link to this post PM Noserose
 
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Re: Misogyny in the Trump and Weinstein era


They need his vote for the tax bill.
12/5/2017, 5:41 pm Link to this post PM Bellelettres
 
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Re: Misogyny in the Trump and Weinstein era


quote:

“My faith in the possibility of us as a collective, a village, was shaken by the 53 percent of white women who voted for The Bully,” writes essayist Sarah Michael Hollenbeck. Others are slightly more sympathetic, and persuasively so. “That there are a lot of women in the United States who are not feminists is not surprising,” Rebecca Solnit argues. “To be a feminist you have to believe in your equality and rights, which can make your life unpleasant and dangerous if you live in a marriage, a family, a community, a church, a state, that does not agree.”



The problem is that many women in those sorts of situations are not even secret feminists. I have no big problem with women not making their feminism known to people who violently oppose feminism. What I have a problem with are women who aren't feminists at all in a society as misogynistic as this one is.

The majority of white women voters did not have to support Trump but they did anyway. That's a sure sign of the power of sexism to turn women into their own worst enemy.

quote:

Liberal men get no pass. “Men on the left can be nearly as relentless in their petulant demands for attention if you make a political choice they disapprove of, such as supporting an imperfect female candidate,” she writes. To a certain kind of progressive white man, “the right time for women is always some day in the future, and the right woman candidate is always the hypothetical one.”



Yes, it seems that very few female candidates ever measure up to their high liberal standards. They would need to be flawed male candidates to do so. I had no problem with Hillary because when compared to her opponent she was easily the better of the two candidates.
12/5/2017, 10:55 pm Link to this post PM Philer Blog
 


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