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Philer Profile
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Re: Who is really to blame for the "epidemic?"


quote:

Geezesss wrote:

quote:

Philer wrote:

quote:

Geezesss wrote:

Would you deregulate it, then ?



No.



Then what are the correct penalties for violating both the intent and morality of your regulations.



What should the penalty be for a drug company which promotes its products with lies and exaggeration when those lies and exaggeration don't lead to people deciding to misuse their drugs? Unless the drug companies had the warning labels and literature removed from their products and told users to go for broke what exactly did they do that was so destructive?

They massively marketed dangerous products that could be used safely when directions for using them were followed. I don't see how they can be responsible when those directions weren't followed by users.
9/3/2019, 12:08 am Link to this post PM Philer Blog
 
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Re: Who is really to blame for the "epidemic?"


"Safely used" I think not, If an MD prescribes oxy's at a certain number and milligrams and that person runs way short, clue. In practices where there is a free flow, they have no problem upping the milligrams and the amount of pills you can get. Another clue, there isn't a darn thing wrong with the patient. The problem with Perdue was oxy's were less addictive than vicodin and percocet, so Perdue's research stated . In 2001 there were 59 oxy deaths, a far improvement over vicodin/percocet deaths. Yet since 1996 there has been over 200,000 deaths from oxy's. Some people aren't paying attention to mass gun deaths but they are drugs, now.
9/3/2019, 4:24 am Link to this post PM katie5445 Blog
 
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Re: Who is really to blame for the "epidemic?"


You know that narcotics can be safely used because you have safely used them yourself, katie. All a person has to do is follow the instructions on the bottle and make sure they don't mix them with other depressant drugs like alcohol. You could have been given a thousand narcotic pills at one time by mistake and as long as you followed the instructions on the bottle and didn't mix them with other similar drugs you would have been perfectly safe.

The number of pills that are available to any one patient at any given time doesn't explain why they sometimes take too many of those pills or mix them with other dangerous drugs.

Any claim that one narcotic is less addictive than some other narcotic may be technically true but any narcotic can be addictive if taken in too big a quantity and taken too often. I doubt that any doctor worth his salt didn't know that regardless of what any drug company claimed. Oxycodone can be very addictive. It's a very similar narcotic to morphine.

Those people who aren't paying that much attention to mass gun fatalities seem to care a lot more about guns and the almost unlimited freedom to own them than they do the victims in those mass shootings. The mass media pays more attention to drug overdoses and harps on the "opioid epidemic" because that is a safe thing to do that is much more popular than talking about any "gun epidemic" and the resultant harm that has made possible.
9/4/2019, 8:55 pm Link to this post PM Philer Blog
 
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Re: Who is really to blame for the "epidemic?"


The difference, I've never been to a physician who over prescribes. What you are missing that many don't understand or accept, there is a huge difference on dependence and managing pain than being addicted. No one gives a "thousand pills by mistake." Dosing is always indicated for severe pain typical is 15 mg. every 6hrs, although milligrams go up to 80 no patient should take over 280 mg. in a 24 hour period and that is dosing for chronic severe pain end of life. If I could have tolerated oxy's post op I would have gotten 20 mg. every 8 hours and no fentanyl, although I sure could have used it! I have mentioned before, rare is it to meet an addict that wasn't an alcoholic, it seems to go hand in hand with all drugs, uppers or downers. If there is such a thing as a gateway drug it would be alcohol. I used them safely because I wasn't a mess, well that isn't completely true but I had boundaries in youth. Persons have a drug of choice but if that drug isn't available, any drug will do you and it doesn't have to be what one would consider "taking drugs." In my generation I mentioned before, glue sniffing, gas sniffing, drinking Robitussin cough syurp, PCP, heroin and opium floated around then as well. My friends did LSD at 17/18, not me, although at 21 I gave it a couple tries and said no thanks. I was more "natural" peyote, mushrooms and pot. When I was in London, ecstasy was and still is popular along with ketamine, which is outrageous, powerful as an anaesthesia and makes you paralytic, where you cannot move or speak, fun times............
9/6/2019, 12:34 am Link to this post PM katie5445 Blog
 
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Re: Who is really to blame for the "epidemic?"


The point is that even if you had been over prescribed some narcotic you wouldn't have said to yourself, "now I can take all of these pills I want." Even being addicted to a narcotic does not explain why someone overdoses because you can easily manage an addiction without taking too much of any given narcotic.

BTW, you have a lot more experience using drugs than I have, including illegal ones. I've never taken any illegal drug. I have been given demerol injections in the hospital but of course it was a legal narcotic and often used back in the 1980s. TV game shows were never more entertaining than shortly after I received one of those injections.
9/7/2019, 11:40 pm Link to this post PM Philer Blog
 
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Re: Who is really to blame for the "epidemic?"


Big problem, you can manage dependence but you can not manage addiction or should I say it is not common, it would be the addict cutting down on narcotics to maintain and that is their choice, which means you have signed yourself up for intervention to a methadone or suboxone program and have been approved, which titrates you down to far less than what you were when using mass amounts. I know you are inexperienced but do you know any alcoholics and the saying one drink is to many and a 1,000 isn't enough, also true for narcotics. I was trying to find a good article for you but what I hit it that is infomative on mental/physical happenings with addicts, is on wiki under addiction. Give it a read. No you do not get an Rx and think I can take all I want and you made half a case, the effects of narcotics are very pleasant but short term....if not prescribed by a pill mill an MD that sees you are going through pills twice as directed or more, will cut you off, those patients are lucky, you were heading into the direction of life in hell. Patients often have drugs left over and start taking them for minor ailments, that is a way to get hooked, I never have to feel pain, physically, which medically is not a good thing and if I have issues like depression, anxiety, money problems, job problems, serious family issues, whether drugs or alcohol, it will catch you. You also deny physical health problems, heroin, try and get an IV in their vein. Big abscessed lumps all over their arms, they're shooting between their toes, severe weight loss, bad nutrition, bad teeth, sleeping difficulties overall bad health, same with meth, cocaine.
9/8/2019, 7:08 pm Link to this post PM katie5445 Blog
 
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Re: Who is really to blame for the "epidemic?"


Isn't it a matter of how much the addict wants to get over his addiction? Of course if he wants to just maintain it he won't do anything to reduce his intake of drugs but if he is tired of it he may gradually reduce his intake of drugs. It's possible. People have done it.

I can certainly understand how people get addicted through narcotic injections. My doctor was concerned that I was requesting the injections of demerol a little too often and they reduced them to one a day given to me at night.
9/8/2019, 8:55 pm Link to this post PM Philer Blog
 
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"Get over" interesting choice of words. That is why a proper MD will stop you in your tracks, They catch you when you might suffer for a few days instead, You still remember the pleasure of demerol after I assume since it's been a long time discontinued for injections that you might realize how easy it is to get addicted and especially having life problems that you are overwhelmed with depression, anxiety, stress. How often do we hear when people are upset, angry, stressed, I need a drink. Is that one or eight? If you have access, you keep upping the dose to get higher and mask issues, you don't maintain, amount always increases. The pattern is you start finding them by pill mills or off the street and is it not unusual for an addict to hide it for a year or two. They deny to you but they know they are addicts. What has happened is they have got themselves in a mess, no money, no job, tapped out family, can be homeless or sleeping on couches, in a car on the street and just don't see a way out, the way out for them sees it as an impossibility to come back into "normal" life. It also takes an average of 6 in patient rehabs to be successful, mostly I think because most rehabs are crap. You then get to fight a lifetime because opiates attach themselves to your brain, you never lose the craving for drugs/alcohol and as life hits us in the face with grief/pain and overwhelming disappointments it is really hard for any addict to not use and relapse. That is when people often die, clean for year or years then relapse.
9/8/2019, 10:14 pm Link to this post PM katie5445 Blog
 
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Re: Who is really to blame for the "epidemic?"


Yes, I still remember how much fun getting those shots of demerol were. To some extent I still miss them. I understand why people can become addicted to narcotics like it and heroin.

Most of what you said is accurate but as you should realize by now, much of the problem of addiction is increased in severity by the hysterical attitude of this society to that problem and the black market in drugs like heroin that exists. The problem of addiction is not a reason for hysterics and melodrama nor condemnation of the addict but simply a calm approach to the problem and a recognition of one very significant fact. People have a right to use narcotics, including heroin! It's their life, not yours.
9/12/2019, 9:16 pm Link to this post PM Philer Blog
 
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Re: Who is really to blame for the "epidemic?"


It's not hysteria, it's an issue you don't take seriously because you don't get it from inexperience and naivety.
9/13/2019, 5:17 pm Link to this post PM katie5445 Blog
 


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